Category: Ministries (page 1 of 19)

These Saints Show Us How To Serve Those In Need

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Who are the poor?

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Last Sunday Fr. Barnabas Powell interviewed FOCUS’ Executive Director, Seraphim Danckaert, on his live radio show Faith Encouraged. Their conversation covered the theology of caring for the poor and how it relates to our salvation.

As humans made in the image and likeness of Christ, we are called to serve the poor.

There are many types of poverty. When hear individuals or communities being described as poor – most often we are hearing stories of physical or financial poverty. Providing assistance for those who do not having the necessities to survive is a worthy cause to champion, and central to FOCUS’ mission as an organization. However, there are also other types of poverty less often heard or spoken about; spiritual poverty, emotional poverty, and even psychological poverty.

If we look beyond our stereotypical ideas of who we think of when we hear the word “poor”, we might find opportunities to carry out our calling to serve in more encounters than we might think.

A coworker who sent a rude email could be dealing with a loss in his family and need someone to care.

A neighbor might be worried about how they are going to afford their mortgage payment next month.

A stranger you see sleeping at the park where you walk your dog might be living in their car, working night shifts trying to save up money for a security deposit.

The list could go on and on and on. How do we know who to serve when a case could be made that everyone we encounter could be experiencing poverty? Surely we have all thought before some people might deserve to be served more than others… but this is not the example Christ set for us!!

We must stop basing our service on our own understanding of who and what causes are “worthy” of addressing.  St. John Chrysostom says that need alone is a poor man’s worthiness. It is our job to pray to God to reveal ways for us to serve each other and love as Jesus did each and every day.

The answer to this prayer might not always feel comfortable. Jesus could ask us to hug a stranger on the street who hasn’t showered in 10 days – but who also hasn’t hugged another human in 10 years. He could ask us to roll down our car window next time we see a cardboard sign and share that $5 you were about to spend on something else. He might ask us to talk to someone we don’t know and listen to their story, even if we’d rather be doing something else.

It might not be easy at first, but if we listen and embrace the strength Christ gives us, we can challenge ourselves to set aside our own judgements and assumptions. Once we set our own understanding aside, our hearts are left open to the opportunities Jesus puts in front of us to live each day in service and in veneration of each other.

Eight Dimes: A Reflection on Almsgiving

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During Lent, we are encouraged and challenged to struggle through some fundamental, yet difficult aspects of Christian life: prayer, fasting, and almsgiving.

What is almsgiving?

Matushka Constantina Palmer wrote,  “The Greek word eleemosyne means ‘alms, charity, mercy.’ In other words, almsgiving is also the act of being merciful, so something as simple as a kind word, or a word not spoken, can be alms.”

To me, almsgiving is eight dimes.

The faintly traced shadows of eight dimes and a note from a man I’ve never met hang on the wall at the National FOCUS office. These dimes were a donation received years ago from Steve, a former resident of St. Herman’s House – FOCUS Cleveland.

His note reads: “I stay at St. Herman’s many years ago. Praise the Lord.”

I don’t know this man’s story, or what it took for him to make this donation, yet his eight dimes and simple note remind me every day to look for opportunities to give alms, charity, and mercy.

In Luke 21 we read:
He looked up and saw the rich putting their gifts into the treasury, and He saw also a certain poor widow putting in two mites.  So He said, “Truly I say to you that this poor widow has put in more than all;  for all these out of their abundance have put in offerings for God,[a] but she out of her poverty put in all the livelihood that she had.”

The Lord teaches us, it is not the amount that is given, but the sacrificial generosity that marks the impact of our almsgiving. I don’t know Steve, who gave those eight dimes, but in his small gift, I know he understands the spirit of almsgiving. Just as he had benefited from his stay at St. Herman’s years before, out of mercy for his fellow man, he felt called to give whatever he was able to benefit another. He didn’t wait until he was a millionaire to make the gift, he gave what he was able and without reservation.

As we enter into Holy Week, we pray for God to reveal in our lives opportunities to give alms. Praise the Lord!

Building Healing Relationships Through Service

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Photo credit Matthias Zomer

How does serving heal?

When we strive to truly serve others we are not seeking to fix something that is broken or help someone who is weak. Instead, we are choosing to serve a life that is whole, a life that is made in the image of God, a life that is the living Icon of Christ himself. 

Rachel Naomi Remen in her article, Helping Fixing or Serving?, states that fixing and helping are work of the ego, but serving is work of the soul. Where helping and fixing can leave wounds, serving can heal.

“We serve life not because it is broken, but because it is holy”

When we see our lives and the lives of others as whole, we stop serving with ego and begin to “serve with ourselves, and we draw from all of our experiences. Our limitations serve; our wounds serve; even our darkness can serve…The wholeness in us serves the wholeness in others and the wholeness in life.”b

Serving heals by recognizing the wholeness and holiness of life.

As we continue our journey of lent, let’s challenge ourselves to surrender to a mindset of serving, that it may bring our communities strength, renewal and healing.

Read the whole article here: Helping, Fixing or Serving?  By: Rachel Naomi Remen

Family of Youngstown businessman facing deportation feeds the homeless in Cleveland

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“The Othman family helped feed 200 people at Cleveland’s St. Herman’s House on Friday.”
 Read about these St. Herman House Volunteers here

Gifts of Transformation (Pt. 2)

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From Pt. 1: I worry that, as FOCUS Executive Director Seraphim Danckaert writes, we are not contributing to “the most neglected facet of spiritual life and revitalization” in our ministry and parish life: loving, reverent relationships with people and communities that suffer from social injustice. And as we see our national life become more contemptuous and divided, my worry increases. What are we doing? What am I doing? Who will help the huddled masses on my Facebook feed, the countless statistics about food insecurity and families in shelters numbing and breaking my heart at the same time?

These issues are complex, and my feelings of anger and powerlessness are real. But what’s also real is this: my four-year-old has a Christmas book called “Who Is Coming to Our House.” The story describes the many preparations that the animals undertake to prepare for the holy family’s coming: stacking hay, sweeping floors, and spinning beautiful webs to decorate the cowstall where Mary gives birth. It is a sweet retelling of the Nativity narrative, and it illuminates two important things for us: what we give, no matter how small, is necessary if it’s a help to our neighbor, and in the Christmas season, we are brought to see our Lord as a fragile baby, sleeping in a cowstall, his body the same as our bodies, our vulnerability shared with him.

Christ took on flesh, not out of duty or theological principle, but out of love. St. Athanasius writes that, in Christ’s incarnation, he “did not come to make a display. He came to heal and to teach suffering men.” What is this healing? What do we need Christ to teach us?

The answers to those questions, thankfully, are simple. What is healed is our separation from God and from each other, and what we need Christ to teach us is what he has already spoken: “Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.” It is easy to see “the least of these” as abstractions, or as people suffering from issues that are distant from us. But what Carl’s story shows us is that privilege and status cannot protect us from brokenness. What happened to Carl could happen to you, or to me, for any number of reasons: poverty, anxiety, disability, a bounced check, a sudden illness, a lost job, a dying neighborhood. None of us is immune from suffering, and no single person is too far off to befriend and serve and love. As Carl says, we are all “brothers and sisters.” If we ourselves are so vulnerable, yet so connected, what does it mean for each of us to serve and love?

For me, and hopefully for you, it means giving more to the work of FOCUS North America. My financial gift, though small, can keep Carl serving food to many more people in the coming year. It can help FOCUS Detroit director Eric Shanburn hire plumbers for struggling Detroit families whose pipes have burst and whose paychecks don’t stretch far enough to cover cost. It can help the Renovation Angel project employ more at-risk youth to rehab kitchens; it can provide a Blessing Bag to a homeless neighbor on the street. But most importantly, it can connect me to FOCUS’s ongoing, life-giving work in the lives of men, women, and children whose struggles may be different than mine, but whose hearts are the same to God. If the animals in the stable could prepare a place for Christ, what more should we do when we see him in the faces of those whom FOCUS North America seeks to serve?

In this season of giving, it’s time we change the language. It’s time to see that, rather than donating, we are transforming lives and communities – and God willing, ourselves – through our financial contributions. It’s time to stop scrolling through news segments and start seeing, with clear eyes, the world that Christ came to heal. As you consider what you can give, know that me and my family are giving right alongside you, and that each dollar given is a step towards a transformed life, your own life included.

By Allison Backous Troy

Gifts of Transformation (Pt. 1)

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“I try to change the language,” Carl says, his voice deep and direct. “These are our brothers and sisters…our citizens, our community.” At St. Herman House Cleveland, “changing the language” is key to the ongoing transformation that Carl Cook, head chef, sees in both his life and the lives of those who come to St. Herman’s for food, resources, and fellowship. He’s proud of the fact that, since 2012, over 70,000 hot meals have been served annually at St. Herman’s. But Carl also knows that words, like meals, have the power to nourish and restore.

How does Carl know this? And how does his ability to see the human face in a long dinner line speak to you, and me? He’s been in those lines himself. Twelve years sober, Carl has known homelessness, hunger, and addiction. His story of transformation is both honest and surprising, challenging and inspiring. For me, it both opens my eyes and encourages my heart, which is more prone to worry than to hope. And for FOCUS North America, it’s a living icon – in Carl’s story of change and renewal, we not only see a life transfigured, but a whole community transformed.

Carl’s journey to being St. Herman’s head chef starts in a surprising place – a middle class town, his father a politician and his mother a loving, doting presence. What plagued him was not a lack of privilege, but a learning disability. Carl was diagnosed with dyslexia at an early age, and its presence in his life brought him serious challenges and shame. His family “hired the best tutors…(and) my parents made sure I had the best education and the best tools,” but his confidence and sense of self took a very direct hit. The stress of his learning disability led him to secretly try a sip of alcohol at a family party, and by the age of twelve, he was sneaking alcohol into thermoses on camping trips; after culinary school, heroin and cocaine entered his life. He comments on how his journey into addiction came from a deeply personal, spiritual need. “Your only sickness,” he says, “is secrets. I hid it from my parents, I did different things my parents wanted me to do to make them happy. I kept (my addictions) secret from my parents for many, many years”

By 2005, Carl’s addictions were secrets no longer. After time in prison and alienation from his family, Carl found himself in an alley, drunk on wine, hoping that the police didn’t see him sneaking alcohol. He felt “comfortable, too comfortable” with his addictions and his isolation. And suddenly, he says “God just sent this clarity. My whole body froze. I could hear my (dead) father just talking to me…I had to make a very profound decision.”

That decision was sobriety. Ten months later, Carl was sober and working for a nonprofit’s hunger program, and in 2013, he took over as head chef for St. Herman’s Cleveland. His experiences on the street shaped his vision towards understanding homeless people as persons, not just statistics or passing faces.

“It starts with the name “the homeless,” he continues. “When we take away the word “homelessness” and look at a person, we may be open to see an individual. It starts with me and my team to look past homelessness and more at the individual and open the door to relationship.”

That word relationship is what strikes me as I look at myself and the work of FOCUS. I consider myself to be an educated advocate for the poor, the homeless, and the socially disenfranchised in America. I share impassioned posts on Facebook, I support FOCUS North America, and as part of a future clergy family, I wonder about the ways Orthodox Christians understand systemic poverty. I worry that, as FOCUS Executive Director Seraphim Danckaert writes, we are not contributing to “the most neglected facet of spiritual life and revitalization” in our ministry and parish life: loving, reverent relationships with people and communities that suffer from social injustice. And as we see our national life become more contemptuous and divided, my worry increases. What are we doing? What am I doing? Who will help the huddled masses on my Facebook feed, the countless statistics about food insecurity and families in shelters numbing and breaking my heart at the same time?

To be continued.

By Allison Backous Troy

Remedy for violence

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FOCUS Pittsburgh’s trauma response team was featured on the front page of the Pittsburgh Post Gazette.

See the pdf of the day’s paper here.

New trauma-response teams prepare for Thanksgiving Day rollout

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“The volunteers are in the final stages of training to be a part of FOCUS Pittsburgh’s new trauma response teams, which will, starting on Thanksgiving Day, respond to homicides in Allegheny County and provide immediate, on-site psychological and mental health care to residents and others affected by the violence.”

Click here to read the full article on this FOCUS Pittsburgh program

Family Ministry Conference Held: The Orthodox Family in a Changing World

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“The sessions highlighted some of the challenges families face within contemporary culture. FOCUS North America led a hands-on poverty simulation that helped participants imagine what a life of poverty might resemble and how love should be the response to those who live in such conditions.”

Click Here to read the full article on this conference.

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